New Work

baghead (1)

Courtesy of Henrik Kerstens

CONSUMER culture in the 20th/21st centuries has embraced the plastic bag as a disposable object – our environment is sadly compromised.

Our local community is part of a sophisticated first world country, and yet still we seem to ignore this indiscriminate use and disposal of the bags

I have been exploring ways in which they can be recycled using a wearable vernacular – in exhibitions including Greensmith ( Brisbane and California ), String Fundamentals ( Hong Kong ), and conducting workshops ( in FNQ ) on the making of wearable objects using plastic bags.

I also use recycled fishing line in my work, another potentially environmentally dangerous material that is found in abundance along the coastline and on the reef.

Reusing a few plastic bags will not solve the problem, but hopefully alert people to think before they take their groceries home in another contribution to an environmental disaster.

 Title Year Materials Dimensions
Dark Blooms – Armpiece 2016
  • Recycled & reused checkout plastic bags
  • Reused & dyed found fishing line
  • Recycled rose gold
270mm (L), 60mm (W) 50mm (H)
Dark Blooms (washed) – Neckpiece 2016
  • Recyled & reused checkout plastic bags
  • Reused & dyed found fishing line
230mm (L), 390mm(W), 55mm (H)
All-a-flutter: Brooch Pins 2016
  • Recycled plastic checkout bags
  • Recycled argentium silver
 
All-a-flutter: Earrings 2016
  • Recycled plastic checkout bags
  • Recycled plastic checkout bags.
  • Works in this series can be seen in the Queensland Art Gallery Store
 
JMGQ Pin Swap 2016
  • Recycled plastic checkout bags
  • Recycled argentium silver